December 27, 2019

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit
Grapefruit offers a refreshing, bright flavor with a hint of sweetness to many dishes. We've gathered some of our favorite recipes to help brighten up your winter days.

Broiled Grapefruit with Greek Yogurt

Not overly sweet, this recipe is a grapefruit-lover's delight. The warm grapefruit pairs well with the cold, honey-sweetened yogurt and adding crunchy granola or nuts makes for a more substantial breakfast or healthy snack. It's the perfect addition to your next brunch!

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Grapefruit and Yogurt Cake

Deliciously moist with a tangy flavor from the yogurt and grapefruit. Though this makes a great dessert, it’s also great for breakfast alongside a hot cup of lemon herbal tea.

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Grapefruitini

Sweet and tart, this refreshing citrus drink is perfect for your next gathering or for ringing in the new year! The tart grapefruit flavor is perfectly balanced by the sugared rim.

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Grapefruit and Ginger Tart

With a chocolate-lined crust and gingery mascarpone filling, this grapefruit tart is as delicious as it is pretty.

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Kale and Grapefruit Salad

Our new favorite salad! The tart and slightly bitter grapefruit is balanced by the creamy and rich avocado - a match made in heaven! It also makes a great packed lunch if you add the avocado separately (the kale can withstand being dressed and doesn’t get soggy).

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Mixed Grapefruit & Roasted Beet Salad

Earthy beets and tangy grapefruit pair perfectly with briny capers and a sweet-savory balsamic reduction in this colorful salad.

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

Grapefruit and Avocado Tacos

These colorful vegan tacos are as pretty as they are delicious. We love the balance of the tart grapefruit and the creamy avocado. This flavorful combination is sure to be a crowd-pleaser.

Recipe Roundup: Grapefruit

How To Add Farm Stand Products to Your Delivery:
CSA members - head on over to our online Farm Stand Market to customize your upcoming delivery. Market is open from noon on Thursday until 10 pm, 2 days before your scheduled delivery day. After you confirm your produce items, click the orange button "Confirm and Continue To Other Farm Products" to add the products to your delivery.

Not part of our farm family? Find out if we deliver to your neighborhood. You can even get your whole office in on the fun with our office snack packs. Find more information about our office deliveries here.

December 19, 2019

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

Quick and Easy: Just Add Booze

Keep a few of these mixers on hand for quick and easy cocktails that taste fancy and delicious but require no effort. All you have to do is add the spirit of your choice!

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

Spindrift
Perfect for mixing with vodka, tequila, gin or any clear spirit!

Dry Soda
Step up your vodka soda with these slightly sweetened botanical bubblies by Dry Soda.

Bloody Mary Mix
The ultimate Sunday morning (or Christmas morning) drink.

Mulling Spices
These mulling spices are great for mulled wine, sangria or hot apple cider and whiskey!

For the Novice Mixologist

These cocktails are slightly more involved, but they're still easy to throw together without getting stuck in the kitchen all night. Your friends and family will definitely be impressed!

Sparkling Apple Cider Bourbon

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

This super simple cocktail idea from Spindrift tastes like fall and is perfect for sipping by the fire on a brisk day.
Pour the cider and bourbon over ice, top with lemon Spindrift and garnish with thinly sliced apple.

Pomegranate Jalapeno Shrub Margarita

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

This slightly spicy shrub makes for a perfect margarita mixer! If you want to make it look extra fancy, garnish with pomegranate seeds.
Combine pomegranate jalapeno shrub, tequila, triple sec, orange juice and lime juice if using. Stir to combine. Add ice and serve.

For the Cocktail Connoisseur

Ready to take your skills to the next level? These drinks are made with fresh ingredients and are sure to be crowd-pleasers. Prepare the simple syrups ahead of time so that you can enjoy celebrating with your friends and family.

Rosemary Grapefruit Refresher

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

For the rosemary simple syrup:
  • 1 cup Water
  • 1/4 c Rosemary leaves
  • 1 cup Sugar
For the drink:
  • 2-3 oz Gin or vodka
  • Grapefruit spindrift (or 3 oz fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice and sparkling water)
  • Rosemary sprigs for garnish
  • 1 tbsp Rosemary simple syrup

To make the simple syrup: Combine water, sugar and rosemary leaves in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about one minute until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and let the syrup steep for about 30 minutes.

To make the cocktail: Combine gin or vodka, grapefruit spindrift and rosemary simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake to combine. Pour in a glass over ice and garnish with a rosemary sprig.

Pear and Ginger Sparkler

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails

For the ginger honey simple syrup:
  • 1/4 cup Honey
  • 1/4 cup Water
  • 1" piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
For the drink:
  • Ginger honey simple syrup
  • 2 pears, peeled and pureed
  • Champagne or Prosecco

To make the simple syrup: Heat the honey, water and ginger in a small saucepan over medium heat. Simmer until the honey dissolves into the water. Remove from heat and let the syrup steep for about 30 minutes.

To make the cocktail: Combine 1 ounce of ginger honey syrup and 1 ounce of peach puree to a champagne glass. Top with champagne or prosecco. Optional: garnish with thinly sliced pear, crystallized ginger or lemon wedges.

Winter Sangria

Warm Up With These Winter Cocktails
  • 1 Bottle red wine
  • 3 tbsp Sugar
  • 1 oz Orange juice
  • Cinnamon sticks
  • 2 Cloves
  • 1 grapefruit, sliced
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 2 apples, sliced
  • 1 cup cranberries
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1 cup ginger ale or ginger beer
Combine all ingredients in a large pitcher and stir until sugar is dissolved. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving over ice.

Make sure to check out more cocktail and mocktail recipes on our website!

How To Add Farm Stand Products to Your Delivery:
CSA members - head on over to our online Farm Stand Market to customize your upcoming delivery. Market is open from noon on Thursday until 10 pm, 2 days before your scheduled delivery day. After you confirm your produce items, click the orange button "Confirm and Continue To Other Farm Products" to add the products to your delivery.

Not part of our farm family? Find out if we deliver to your neighborhood. You can even get your whole office in on the fun with our office snack packs. Find more information about our office deliveries here.

December 11, 2019

Spice It Up: Cloves

Spice It Up: Cloves

About

Cloves are made from the unopened flower buds of the clove tree, a small tropical member of the evergreen family. The tree is native to the Maluku Islands of Indonesia, also known as the “Spice Islands”, although it’s also grown in Madagascar and Tanzania. When the flower buds change from a pale green color to a bright red color, they are harvested and dried. Named after its distinctive shape, the word clove comes from the Latin word clavus, meaning nail. The dried flower buds can be used for cooking and seasoning as well as medicinal purposes

Spice It Up: Cloves

History

The history of cloves is similar to the history of nutmeg and mace. Cloves were extremely popular throughout Europe, leading the Portuguese and Dutch to fight for control of the islands that grew these spices. The spice trade was incredibly lucrative, with nutmeg and cloves leading the market. Cloves were worth their weight in gold. Their value only began to decrease once the French introduced the clove tree to Mauritius in 1770, followed by Guiana, Brazil and the West Indies. Today, 80% of commercial clove still comes from Indonesia.

Cooking With Cloves

Clove is a pungent warm spice with a sweet yet astringent flavor that is great for both sweet and savory dishes. Although it’s a warm spice that is often grouped with nutmeg, cinnamon and allspice, cloves have a much more powerful flavor so they are typically used in much smaller quantities. The intense flavor comes from the compound eugenol, which is also used for medicinal purposes. Cloves are very common in traditional Indian dishes and are used to flavor sauces, soups and rice. It’s also very popular in Mexican cuisine, in which it's typically paired with cumin or cinnamon.

Spice It Up: Cloves

Other uses

Eugenol is the main element in the essential oil that is made from cloves. The oil is popular for adding to perfumes, flavoring synthetic vanilla and it’s also an important incense element in Chinese and Japanese cultures. Eugenol is thought to have antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and anesthetic properties and it has historically been used in dentistry. It’s commonly found in over-the-counter medicines, throat sprays and mouthwashes. Because of its antimicrobial and anti-fungal properties, it’s also thought to be effective in healing skin ailments and blemishes. Beyond medicinal uses, clove oil has been used as a natural herbicide and even a mosquito repellent. Plus, cloves are commonly smoked in cigarettes called kretek in Indonesia.

Spice It Up: Cloves

Buying and Storing

You can find cloves in the grocery store either ground or whole. Whole cloves tend to maintain their flavor and potency longer than ground cloves. When stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place, whole cloves will keep for around a year while ground cloves will only keep for up to six months. Because cloves have a hard, woody texture, they are not eaten whole and are normally removed before serving, but you can always grind them into a powder using a coffee grinder.

Spice It Up: Cloves

Spice It Up: Easy Ways To Use Cloves

  • Add ground cloves and curry powder to sauteed veggies with meat or tofu
  • Add cloves and cinnamon sticks to apple cider when heating it on the stove (just make sure to strain them out)
  • Pierce an onion with whole cloves and to soups, broths or braised dishes to impart flavor without having to grind the cloves or pick them out later
  • Spice up a fruit compote with ground cloves and serve over breakfast waffles or alongside a creamy cheese as an appetizer
  • Add ground cloves with walnuts and raisins to your favorite stuffing recipe

How To Add Farm Stand Products to Your Delivery:
CSA members - head on over to our online Farm Stand Market to customize your upcoming delivery. Market is open from noon on Thursday until 10 pm, 2 days before your scheduled delivery day. After you confirm your produce items, click the orange button "Confirm and Continue To Other Farm Products" to add the products to your delivery.

Not part of our farm family? Find out if we deliver to your neighborhood. You can even get your whole office in on the fun with our office snack packs. Find more information about our office deliveries here.

December 9, 2019

Spice It Up: Vanilla


The word vanilla is sometimes used for things that are boring, blah or basic. However, true food lovers know that vanilla is anything but plain. Its complex flavor profile, laborious growing process and interesting history all contribute to what makes this spice so intriguing.
Spice It Up: Vanilla

About

It grows as a vine and can be up to 300 feet long. The vine features pale green-yellow flowers that, when pollinated, grow a fruit that looks like a string bean. It takes about nine months for a vanilla pod to ripen, and then it must undergo a long and tedious curing process. The little specks that you can see in high-quality vanilla bean ice cream are the tiny black speeds that fill vanilla pods.

Spice It Up: Vanilla

History

Vanilla is native to South and Central America. The Totonacs are credited for first harvesting vanilla, but its production was taken over by the Aztecs when they conquered the Totonacs, and then the Spanish when they conquered the Aztecs. The Spanish brought both vanilla and cacao back to Europe where it was grown in gardens, but the vanilla never produced fruit. Later they learned that this is because the Melipona bee was needed to pollinate the flowers, but that species didn’t live in Europe. Years later on the island of Reunion, a tedious technique for hand-pollinating the flower was discovered, making Reunion and its neighboring island, Madagascar, very popular for their vanilla industry. About 75 percent of vanilla today still comes from Madagascar or Reunion. Up until the 17th century, vanilla was mostly just used as an additive for drinking chocolate. It wasn’t until the 1780s that the French began using vanilla to flavor ice cream, a recipe created by Thomas Jefferson. By the late 1800s, vanilla was in high demand, partially in thanks to its use in cola beverages.

Spice It Up: Vanilla

Harvesting

Vanilla is the second most expensive spice in the world due to its labor-intensive production. The vast majority of vanilla that is sold in today’s marketplace is hand-pollinated. Growers must be very skilled in order to do this, as the flowers only have about one to two days in their growth cycle in which they can be pollinated, otherwise they will wither and die. After harvesting, the beans go through a tedious curing process that consists of alternating between sun drying during the day and sweating at night for up to thirty days. The entire process, from planting the seed to the finished product, takes about one year. It takes around five to seven pounds of vanilla beans to create one pound of processed vanilla. All of this contributes to vanilla’s high cost of about $300 per pound.

Spice It Up: Vanilla

Vanilla vs. Vanillin

Because of its high cost, 99% of vanilla-flavored products on the market don’t contain vanilla. Vanilla is made up of about 250 chemical compounds that contribute to its flavor. The most significant component of vanilla’s fragrance is vanillin, a compound that is fairly easy to create artificially and is about twenty times less expensive. Most vanilla extracts that you find in the grocery store are made with vanillin, unless they say “pure vanilla extract”. Vanillin isn’t unhealthy or dangerous to consume, and it does taste extremely similar, however, its flavor is not as strong or as complex as pure vanilla extract.

How To Add Farm Stand Products to Your Delivery:
CSA members - head on over to our online Farm Stand Market to customize your upcoming delivery. Market is open from noon on Thursday until 10 pm, 2 days before your scheduled delivery day. After you confirm your produce items, click the orange button "Confirm and Continue To Other Farm Products" to add the products to your delivery.

Not part of our farm family? Find out if we deliver to your neighborhood. You can even get your whole office in on the fun with our office snack packs. Find more information about our office deliveries here.