February 19, 2019

Rushing Water And Deep Mud

Rushing Water and Deep Mud 1

Farm News

It’s hard to walk around the farm with all the mud; driving is even more difficult. There are a few main graveled drives through the farm that are drivable, but even those leave the trace of the wheels through the gravelly, muddy mixture. Parking next to the canal bridge, I get out and start walking down the roads. There is a squishing and crackling sound under my feet. Since sometime last night, the rain stopped for a moment. There are deep clouds hanging overhead, but nothing is falling from them besides their shadows. 

Rushing Water and Deep Mud 2

The creek is roaring. All the water that fell onto the hills last night is only just making its way to the bottom of this valley, and there is still another valley to get to the bottom of before it will make it to the sea. I am impressed with the amount of brown, sediment-filled storm water that is rushing through the creek. It is at least six, maybe eight feet deep, so deep that the water level has creeped up into the branches of the trees near the creek, the trees that are normally high and dry. The sound of the water is mesmerizing.

Rushing Water and Deep Mud 3

Following a dirt road along the creek, I am impressed that there are not clumps of mud sticking to my feet. The soil here is so sandy that it just gives way to my feet slightly. Thinking about this, I am startled by a deer that has been hunkered down in a patch of wild grape vines—she is so close that I can see the patterns of her hair bunched up and spikey form being soaked all night. Her large black eyes see me but are focused with her stern face on getting away. To my surprise, she jumps right in to the roaring creek and begins swimming to the other side. The color of her hide and the color of the storm water are not that different. I admire her as she slices her way across the current. It crosses my mind to try to take a picture, but the moment is going too quickly. Exiting on the other side, she is significantly downstream from where she entered. Quickly, she trots into some brush where I can no longer see her.

Rushing Water and Deep Mud 4

On the way back, I decide on a road less traveled. The soil is thicker here. It sticks to the bottom of my boot and with each step, my boots become heavier until the mud layer falls off, resetting the process. In the field, cover crops are established and almost a foot tall, which is good, because as soon as it is dry enough, this field will be turned around and planted to tomatoes. Those very tomato plants sit in the greenhouse nestled under the cover of plastic and warmth, protected from the elements that would surely kill them. They are less than two inches tall and only have two leaves. I am feeling comfortable that the weather, this field and those tomatoes are on schedule to synchronize perfectly on the first week of April. 

Make sure to find us on Instagram @farmfreshtoyou and @farmerthaddeus.

Love on the Farm: Samantha & Brandon

samantha and brandon 3

Brandon and Samantha started dating in 2013 and have spent quite a bit of time on the farm. Samantha is a super nanny and has watched all 12 of Barnes-Barsotti kids. Samantha and Brandon are frequent visitors to our Farm Fresh To You farm events and festivals.

February 15, 2019

Love on the Farm: Michael & Liz

Love on the Farm: Michael & Liz

Michael and Liz met in San Francisco, but their relationship flourished in Yolo County, where Liz is from.

February 14, 2019

Food From The Heart

Food From The Heart
Happy Valentine’s Day! Call us romantics, but we’re feeling the love here at Farm Fresh To You today. We love all of our farm box members who support local farmers, organic produce and sustainable practices. We love our family of passionate employees who share in our values and work hard as a team. We also love all of the amazing artisan food purveyors that we get to work with. If there’s one thing we really love, it’s delicious food, and it’s even better when we get to share it with you! Today we want to take a moment to introduce you to some of our partners that make their food with love.

We Love Jam

The owners of We Love Jam began making jam for fun from the Blenheim apricot tree in their backyard. Each summer, they picked fresh fruit from the 80-year-old tree and made jam to share with their friends and family. On a whim, they sent some jars to food magazines, and Food & Wine magazine loved it so much they called it the best jam they’ve ever tried in their February 2002 issue. Overnight, what started as a hobby became a successful business.
“We still make everything by hand and source our fruit from local farms. Everything is made in our own custom-made commercial kitchen. As owners, we are directly involved in every facet of this business. It doesn’t get more hands-on than this. It is very rewarding working with local farms and making our customers happy.”
We Love Jam

Theo

Theo is passionate about changing the world through chocolate. As the first Organic and Fair Trade certified chocolate factory in North America, they believe that the finest chocolate should be created in an entirely ethical and regenerative fashion.
“As a company rooted in cocoa, our mission is to create a more beautiful, compassionate, and enduring world by responsibly making delicious and inspiring products for everyone. This is why our co-founder Joe Whinney pioneered the first supply of organic cocoa into the US in 1994, and we remain committed to making amazing fair trade and organic bean-to-bar chocolate today. If you’ve ever had a Theo treat, we hope you’ll find that our love for creating delicious chocolate is evident in each bite.”

Theo

Old Dog Ranch

Old Dog Ranch is a fifth-generation family farm on the Calaveras River in San Joaquin County, California. The family has lived and farmed at the ranch since 1912. Growing up on the ranch (which is named for two of the family’s beloved, long-lived canine companions), Mollie Sitkin loved experimenting with ingredients picked from the fields and orchards just outside her kitchen door. Today, Mollie makes the Old Dog Ranch line of walnut snacks and walnut butters with organic Chandler walnuts from an orchard her father planted the year she was born.
“I’ve always loved serving delicious things to people and seeing them smile, but being able to grow the ingredients and make the snacks healthy takes it to a whole new level for me. Freshness and growing high-quality walnuts are the most important thing for our family business.”

Old Dog Ranch

Upper Crust Bakery

Upper Crust Bakery started baking bread 33 years ago in 1986. It was started by a husband-and-wife team Mo and Trudy Kalinsky in Northern California. Together, they made a perfect duo. He was passionate about the science of bread baking, and she was the face of the business and an amazing salesperson. Their son grew up in the bakery learning the craft.

Their son, Lorin, ended up building a career for himself in entrepreneurship and technology. He started a family of his own, and they split their time between living in the Bay Area and France. In 2013, his family relocated back to California. His love for baking was rekindled and with his parents’ blessing, he took over the business in 2017.
“It’s an exciting time to be in the good food business. We feel privileged to live in what is one of the most fertile, productive agricultural regions in the world. People are passionate about supporting local agriculture and eating well. Because of our presence at dozens of farmers markets across Northern California, our bakery has established unique links to many of the family farms and agricultural producers in our region. We source local ingredients and support local agriculture whenever possible, and we are proud to provide good food to our community.”
Upper Crust

Chivas

About 15 years ago, founder, Donna, learned about the nutritional benefits of drinking raw goat milk and decided to buy two French Alpine goats. Receiving 2 gallons of fresh milk a day, she taught herself to make cheeses, yogurts, ice creams, and eventually, soap! Donna used to have what her kids would call “alligator skin” -- super dry and flaky -- but, her homemade goat milk soap transformed her skin! Her friends and family loved the soaps so much too, that she kept making more. With the help of her daughter, Lauren, Donna’s DIY home project soon turned into what is now Chivas Skin Care. Donna and Lauren created the business because they wanted to share with others the same wonderful products that Donna had formulated for her family.
“Farm-fresh milk is the number 1 ingredient in all of our soaps, making each bar ultra-rich and creamy. Goat milk is the foundation of our soaps, and we believe that a high-quality soap like ours should be the foundation of any skincare routine. The better quality the soap, the less lotions and potions are needed. 
We use high-quality and all-natural ingredients in our soaps, which make them only that much more gentle, soothing and nourishing for the skin. We use food-grade olive oil, plant-based, essential oils, sustainable palm oil, and fair trade shea butter. We do NOT use any fragrances, perfumes, artificial colorants, preservatives or the like. When you read our ingredients list you can understand each ingredient. We always joke, “you really could wash your mouth out with this soap."
Chivas Skin Care

How To Add Their Delicious Products to Your Delivery:

CSA members - head on over to our online Farm Stand Market to customize your upcoming delivery. Market is open from noon on Thursday until 6 pm, 2 days before your scheduled delivery day. After you confirm your produce items, click the orange button "Confirm and Continue To Other Farm Products" to add the products to your delivery.

Not part of our farm family? Find out if we deliver to your neighborhood.

February 13, 2019

Love on the Farm: Thaddeus & Moyra

Love on the Farm: Thaddeus & Moyra

Thaddeus and Moyra met at the San Francisco Ferry Building in the summer of 2004. Moyra was home from college, working at Bay Crossings and Cowgirl Creamery, and living with her parents. Thad was working at our Farm Fresh To You store and splitting his time between living on the farm and in San Francisco.

February 12, 2019

Love on the Farm: Gavin & Lilly

Rooting Around: Our Farm Blog

In general, Gavin and Lilly did a lot of falling in love on the farm. Gavin lived on the farm and would travel to SF on weekends to see friends - and that's when he met Lilly. They were at a mutual friend’s birthday party where he offered her a Candystripe fig from the farm. One fig led to another, and they spent most of the party exchanging summer stories and dancing until the wee hours.

Love on the Farm: Ambler & Ben

IMG_3193
Ambler and Ben first met when they were teaching at the same school in New Orleans. It was love at first sight! After many years of dating, they decided to make it official, and tie the knot.

February 9, 2019

Love On The Farm: Freeman & Carol

Love on The Farm Freeman & Carol 3
Freeman and Carol met in high school in the FFA (Future Farmers of America) and competed against each other in public speaking competitions. She was 15. He was 16 and had a truck.

February 8, 2019

Love On The Farm: Jordan & Rosch

Love On The Farm Jordan & Rosch
We've got a few more stories we'll be sharing over the next few days of how friends, families and folks you maybe have never met before have celebrated and found love on our farm. It’s an honor that you, our community, share these everyday extraordinary moments with us.

February 7, 2019

Love on the Farm: Max & Raemonn

Love on the Farm: Max & Raemonn

We love hearing stories of true love found on the farm. Max and Reamonn first met at our Capay Tomato Festival and we’ve loved seeing them back on the farm for the festival year after year.

February 6, 2019

Know Your Farmer: Redwood Hill Farm

Know Your Farmer: Redwood Hill Farm
In 1968, Kenneth and Cynthia Bice moved their family from the city of Los Angeles to the redwoods of Sonoma County to establish their own farm, complete with ducks, chickens, rabbits, goats, pigs, and sheep. Their three children became involved with 4-H and began raising their own goats.